Anthony Hazelaar's 1/25 scale
Model T Ford
Car and Truck Models



 
 
 

Anthony Hazelaar is from the Netherlands and has been
building models for some years. He is now building a
series of Ford Model T pickup trucks and car models.
I thought that they looked quite nice and should have a
place to display them.
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Just wait here for a moment and one of
Anthony's models will be right along.
I see one coming now !!!
Yes and it's a 1923 Ford Model T Depot Hack

 

The following is the first of the series to be completed.
Some of the model kits that Anthony uses are quite rare and are
collectors items. The 1922 Ford Model T Roadster and 1925 Ford Model T
5-Window coupe are two examples.



 
 

This page shows only a small part of some of Anthony's Models.
The above link will take you to his own page with the remainder of his collection

This page was last updated on Feb 25, 2017



 

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 1923 Ford Model T Depot Hack
 
 
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1923 Ford Model T Express Wagon
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1923 Ford Model T Pickup
 
Anthony had the following to say about the
1925 Ford Model T Stake Bed Truck

"The 1925 Stake Bed is a special conversion made by me. 
The base is a 1925 T Pickup from AMT. 
The roadster body was replaced by a closed cabin body. 
The closed cabin is actually the body from a rare 
AMT 1925 Ford Model T 5-Window coupe. 
The 5-window body was cut in three sections: the front part,
which ends just behind the doors, the middle part with the two small
windows and the rear part.
I discarded the middle section with the two small windows 
and fitted the rear part to the front part. 
Result: a nice and rare 3-window closed cab. 
The rear fenders were removed to make place for the stake bed. 
The stake bed itself was constructed from 40 pieces of cedar wood,
7 plastic parts, 4 brass parts and 48 very small nails.
So I added a total of 99 parts to a kit which only had 40 parts..."

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1925 Ford Model T Stake Bed Truck
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1925 Ford Model T Stake Bed Truck
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1923 Ford Model T Police Depot Hack
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1923 Ford Model T Police Depot Hack
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1923 Ford Model T Police Depot Hack
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1923 and  1927 Model T Police Cars
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1927 Model T Police Car
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1927 Model T Police Car
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1925 Ford Model T Pickup
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 This car was build from a older AMT kit. It looks like a pretty 
straight forward built kit, but I was a little annoyed by the fact 
that the tailgate of the box wasn't functional. To achieve real 
functionality I was forced to make two very small 1/24 scale hinges.
The hinges are about 1/13 of an inch wide (that's about 2 mm)
and about 1/25 of an inch thick (about 1 mm). I used a small 
red copper strip from an old electric relay to fabricate the outside 
of the hinges and used a 1/50 inch (0.5 mm) thin brass wire as the
actual hinge. It was a bit fiddling around with all those small parts, 
but eventually everything worked. The fake plastic chains,
to keep the lid in the lower position, were replaced by real
copper chains 
(officially it's anchor chain for small model boats...).
1925 Ford Model T Pickup
 
 
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1925 Ford Model T Tow Truck
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This model started it's life as a AMT kit from
a 1925 Ford pickup. 
I shortened the sides of the bed and added the towing
equipment from another model (a Lindberg towing truck kit).
The towing equipment received some extra things like lamps 
and reinforcement struts. 
The Lindberg kit also donated a toolbox.
A spare wheel was added on the right side. 
The 'Tires and Tubes' decals were spare decals from another kit.
The towing equipment was not functional, but I made
it fully functional with various parts.
Which reminds me that I really should take a picture 
of the tow truck 'inaction'...
 1925 Ford Model T Tow Truck
This 1926 Model T Sedan Delivery was built 
from a customized kit by Revell. As Anthony only builds
stock cars he had to 'uncustomize' it. The custom body 
was lowered so that had to be raised to normal stock
height and he used spare parts from two other 
AMT kits to replace the custom chassis and wheels 
with a stock chassis and stock wheels. 
A stock front bumper and spare wheel were also
added.
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1926 Ford Model T Sedan Delivery
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1926 Ford Model T Sedan Delivery
 
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1926 Ford Model T Sedan Delivery
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1926 Ford Model T Sedan Delivery
 
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1927 Fort Model T 4 Door Phantom Tourer
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1927 Fort Model T 4 Door Phantom Tourer
 
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1927 Fort Model T 4 Door Phantom Tourer
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This model was built by Anthony from a non-existing kit.
It was build from the remaining parts from other AMT models
with a lot of creative 'input' from him.
1924 Ford Model T Speedster
 
 The 1924 Ford Model T Speedster started it's life as a badly 
build '23 Model T Delivery Van (old AMT kit). 
I took the kit apart, restored the chassis and engine
but wasn't sure what to do with the rest of the car.
After looking at a lot of Model T Ford pictures I decided to
make my own Model T Speedster. The fenders and fire wall
were donated by the '23 Delivery Van. The firewall was
modified (the windshield was cut off) and downsized in height
and width (speed...!). The seats are from an old 
AMT '25 Roadster kit and modified to look like old style
bucket seats. The little tool box is from a '34 Ford Pickup.
The spare tire is a leftover from another AMT '25 Roadster kit. 
The petrol tank used on the speedster models are always
oval and with no spare tank at hand I had to make 
one from scrap. The tank and seat frame were made
from 1 mm plastic. The oval shaped windshield, often
seen on speedster models, was also made from scrap
(actually, the clear plastic came from a CD case...).
Finishing touches were the 'gold' striping on the fenders,
tank, tool box and some other parts and the small 'copper'
Ford name on the radiator (a spare decal from a customized kit).
I'll never know if Henry Ford would have approved this model 
for the production line, but I like it.

 

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1924 Ford Model T Speedster
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1924 Ford Model T Speedster
 
 
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1924 Ford Model T Speedster
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 1924 Ford Model T Speedster
 
 
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 1922 Ford Model T Roadster
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 1922 Ford Model T Roadster
 
 This car is built from a rare kit
from the Aurora company
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1922 Ford Model T Roadster 
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1922 Ford Model T Roadster at the service station
I bought this finished Pickup on eBay a few weeks ago.
I had (conversion) plans for this kit, but when I received it,
it had a beautiful patina of dust. As the seller said '
'vintage dust included".
I decided to keep the kit as it was, as a kind of barn find.
The only thing I changed was adding a front license plate
. I took some pictures with a proper 'layout' 
(the new owner is working on the car) and I think 
you'll agree with me that it would have been a pity to
break up this kit for parts.
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 1924 Ford Model T Pickup
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 1924 Ford Model T Pickup
 
 
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 1924 Ford Model T Pickup
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 1924 Ford Model T Pickup
 
 
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 1924 Ford Model T Pickup
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 1924 Ford Model T Pickup
 
 
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 1924 Ford Model T Pickup
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1924 Ford Model T Pickup
 
 
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1924 Ford Model T Pickup
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1925 Ford Model T Roadster 
 
 
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1925 Ford Model T Roadster 
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1925 Ford Model T Roadster 
 
 
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1925 Ford Model T Roadster 
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1925 Ford Model T 5-Window coupe
 
This car was built from a rare mid sixties kit from AMT 
which was actually exclusively produced for the
Ford Motor Company. Interested Ford buyers received it
as a kind of thank you for 
the interest they showed in the Ford cars.
A rare, hard to find kit.
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1925 Ford Model T 5-Window coupe
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1925 Ford Model T 5-Window coupe
 
The building of a 1923  Model T Ford Fruitwagon
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 I started with a badly build AMT 1923 Delivery Van kit. 
The rear side panels from the van were removed and the
fruitwagon parts (fruit stand floor, rear panel and panel
behind the driver) were added using 1mm plastic.
The fruit stand was constructed from wood.
The scales are a ready bought item but altered to fit in the 
space under the fruit stand. A few weights were made from 
plastic spare material and needle pins. Very small stuff...
The three 'canvas' curtains and the curved reinforcements
you see on the rear vertical struts are spare parts from an 
other old AMT kit, the Depot Hack.
And most of the fruit (the red, green, yellow, orange and red)
are the glass heads of needles.
The 'MacDonald's Fruit' signs were designed by me and 
printed on glossy paper using a high quality color laser printer.
And the name MacDonald.. well, that's my to say thank
you to John MacDonald who's kind enough to devote an 
entire page of his nice website to my car models.

Anthony

1923 Delivery Van Chassis
 
 
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1923 Ford Model T Fruitwagon Body
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And Become a 1923 Ford Model T Fruitwagon
 
 
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The majority of the parts you see on this pictures aren't 
glued together, they are just partially assembled to give you an
idea about the progress.
   
 
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Related Information:

 
 
Anthony has built a 1921-1925 Ford Model T chassis.
He wanted to show the chassis detail which is usually 
not shown on models.
It started it's life as a very simple chassis from an older AMT kit. 
As usual he started with some research to find out how the actual T chassis looked. That proved not to be as easy as he thought. All though there are lot of pictures of the T models, there are surprisingly few pictures showing just the chassis. Not to mention things like information about the wiring diagram.
But eventually he managed to find all the information he needed and here are the result. 
He added to the model:
- the brake pull rod on both sides (very thin plastic rods)
- the gasoline tank with fuel line, sediment bowl and mounting struts
 (scrap built from plastic and brass parts)
- the spark plug wiring (made from a single wire from an electric cable)
- the ignition wiring (a small electric cable with 4 wires, painted in the
 official green, blue, red and black colors)
- a horn on the left side of the engine (of course also wired)

As usual on this page, you can view a larger image by clicking on the picture.

1921-1925 Ford Model T Chassis
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Anthony has done it again. Another beautiful series of Model T Fords
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A rare model of a 1913 Ford Model T Touring.
This kit was part of the Tonka Diorama 
"1913 America, The Model T Ford".
1913 Ford Model T Touring
 
 
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1913 Ford Model T Touring
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1913 Ford Model T Touring
 
 
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1913 Ford Model T Touring
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A 1923 Ford Model T Farm Truck.
I used the chassis, engine hood, radiator, floorpan and some 
other small parts (steering wheel and stuff like that) from a
1923 Delivery Wagon from AMT. The rest of the 'bodywork' 
(firewall, flatbed) was made from real wood. And of course
the whole truck was given a special treatment so it looks like 
a car which had a busy life at the farm.
A 1923 Ford Model T Farm Truck
 
 
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A 1923 Ford Model T Farm Truck
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A 1923 Ford Model T Farm Truck
 
 
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A 1923 Ford Model T Farm Truck
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A 1923 Ford Model T Farm Truck
 
The 1923 Ford Model TT 1-Ton Flatbed Truck
This model was a 1923 Roadster from AMT.
The running boards were shortened and supports were added. 
The rear fender assembly was removed. The front part of the
body, the firewall and windscreen are from the roadster body.
The rest of the bodywork (the C-Cab shape) was made of
1 mm styrene. To produce these parts I made thin cardboard molds 
of a 1923 Paddy Wagon parts.
The flatbed structure was made of actual wood.
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The 1923 Ford Model T 1-Ton Flatbed Truck
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The 1923 Ford Model T 1-Ton Flatbed Truck
 
 
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The 1923 Ford Model T 1-Ton Flatbed Truck
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The 1923 Ford Model T 1-Ton Flatbed Truck
 
A 1925 Ford Model T Touring.
A conversion from a 1927 Model T Touring 
AMT kit to a 1925 Model T Touring.
I used the rear body part from the 27 Touring and the front
body part with windscreen from a 25 Roadster. 
The seats were made from various roadster parts
and modified for the 25 'look'.
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A 1925 Ford Model T Touring
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A 1925 Ford Model T Touring
 
 
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A 1925 Ford Model T Touring
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A 1925 Ford Model T Touring
 
A couple of weeks ago I received an almost complete 
AMT 1925 Model T Roadster 1/24 scale kit in exchange for
some custom kit parts. And a couple of months ago I bought
a Monogram 1/24 scale Mack Bulldog Tank Truck
(it was badly build) to save the chassis and engine parts. 
As there never was a 1/24 scale kit of a Model T Tank Truck
(at least not a stock version) I decided to give it a try and here
is the result. I 'borrowed' the tank from the Mack Tank Truck. 
Actually it's only the top half which was cut in several pieces to 
get the right width and length.The rest was made of 1 mm plastic.
The front part of the body, the firewall and windscreen are
from the '25 Roadster kit. The rest of the bodywork
(the C-Cab shape) was made of 1mm plastic using the cardboard
molds of an AMT 1923 Paddy Wagon kit.
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1925 Model T Texaco Tank Truck
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1925 Model T Texaco Tank Truck
 
 
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1925 Model T Texaco Tank Truck
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1925 Model T Texaco Tank Truck
 
 
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1925 Model T Texaco Tank Truck
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The 1923 T Fruitwagon is the original and very rare AMT kit. I've build another Fruitwagon, but this is the one and only original one!
I was lucky to get my hands on this kit for a reasonable price because all the custom parts were missing. No problem for me, as I always built stock models. A complete kit is rare and can be very, very expensive. There is not much to add regarding building the kit. It was build straight forward out the box. The only difficult thing was painting the fruitstand. The fruit itself is not very realistic, just one piece of plastic, but I think I got it right.
1923 Ford Model T Fruitwagon
 
 
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1923 Ford Model T Fruitwagon
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1923 Ford Model T Fruitwagon
 
 
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1923 Ford Model T Fruitwagon
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1923 Ford Model T Fruitwagon
 
The 1923 T Paddy Wagon is another rare AMT kit. Very difficult to get one, but I finally got one in 2005. As usual the kit was build as a stock model.
There was a decal sheet with Police decals, but after 37 years (the kit is from 1969) these were deteriorated and unusable. To replace them I had some Police signs photoetched and after a paint job they look very smart on the car.
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1923 Ford Model T Paddy Wagon
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1923 Ford Model T Paddy Wagon
 
 
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1923 Ford Model T Paddy Wagon
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1920's Ford Model T Police 
The 1927 T Fire Truck is one of the rare AMT kits I managed to buy in 2005. The kit is from 1969 and was sold in those days for $ 1.38. And you really don't want to know what you have to pay for a mint kit today... My kit was complete, but the box was very bad. Actually, it was falling apart so I got the kit for a decent price. As all my models this kit was build as a stock model. The kit included decals for the Riverside Fire Department, but after 37 years the decals had deteriorated due to age. I had another set custom made for me and allthough they don't show very well on the pictures they
are very nice (and expensive...).
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1927 Ford Model T Fire Truck
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1927 Ford Model T Fire Truck
 
 
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1927 Ford Model T Fire Truck
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1927 Ford Model T Fire Truck
 
 
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1927 Ford Model T Fire Truck
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1927 Ford Model T Fire Truck
 
 
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1925 damaged 5 window coupe body
The 1925 Ford Model TT Dump Truck:

A couple of weeks ago I had the opportunity to buy a AMT 1923 Ford Model T kit on eBay for only $ 6.00. A rare kit because of the unusual transfers. I couldn't resist so I bought it.
After fiddling around with it in my mind for a few days I noticed a picture of a Ford Model TT Dump Truck. And I suddenly realised that that could be a great final for my Ford Model T Project. I have to mention that I also have a body of an AMT 5-window T which was very bad (and cheap..<g>). It had actually holes in the body (see picture 1925 damaged 5-window coupe.jpg), but I managed to restore it a few months ago allthough I had no idea what to do with it. After some consideration I decided to transform the 5-window
body to a 2-door closed cab which was perfect for the dump truck.
Next thing to do was to modify the T chassis to TT chassis. The normal T chassis has a 100 inch wheelbase and the TT has a 124 inch wheelbase so I had to lenghten the chassis with 1.9cm. From the fender assembly the rear fenders, part of the running board and bodywork were removed. The dump section was completely built from scratch and the design is as close as I could get to an old style dump truck with old style reinforcments on both sides. I think I got it pretty right. And now for the most difficult part: how the heck did an early dump truck work? I figured out that an expensive hydraulic system (or something like that) wouldn't make sense on a cheap Ford Truck so I decided to do some investigation an eventually found a few pictures of manually operated dump trucks. 
Right, sooo... how to make a fully functional  1/24 scale manually
operated dump truck...? Well, after a week of thinking ( I was for a short period an engineer, car designer, mechanic, whatever...) and three days of construction I had the perfect working solution. It was great fun, but probably one of the most difficult conversions I've ever made.
And here are the pictures of the 'official' 1925 Ford Model TT "Green Acres Construction Co." Dump Truck.

 
 
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1925 Ford Model TT Dump Truck
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1925 Ford Model TT Dump Truck
 
 
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1925 Ford Model TT Dump Truck
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1925 Ford Model TT Dump Truck
 
 
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1925 Ford Model TT Dump Truck
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1925 Ford Model TT Dump Truck
 
 
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1925 Ford Model TT Dump Truck
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1925 Ford Model TT Dump Truck
The 1925 Model TT Hearse

To Build the build the Model TT Hearse Anthony used the following.

- 1923 AMT T Delivery Truck (left-over parts from previous projects, the fender/running board assembly 
and roof)
- 1925 AMT T Roadster (used the left-over body for the lower part of the cabin)
- 1925 AMT T Roadster (chassis, engine, tires, wheels, radiator, engine hood; spare parts received from a 
fellow model builder)
- 1927 AMT T Touring (the red seat in the cabin)
The chassis and running boards were lengthened to get the right lenght for a Model T Truck.
The upper part of the cabin was made from 1mm plastic. The roof of the cabin is part of  a 1923 AMT
Delivery Van roof. 

The wood interior you see on the pictures is African padauk veneer, a dark red wood. It was sanded and lacquered eight times. The last layer was sanded with very fine 1200 waterproof sandpaper to get a super smooth satin finish. After that the veneer was cut in the correct pieces, glued together and treated with a dark furniture wax. The floor is oak veneer and was treated the same way as the padauk.

The hearse section was finished with some detail painting with black/gold paint.

Some statistics:
- roof 14 parts
- rear door 20 parts
- inside panels, floor and roof 75 parts
- outside panels 60 parts
Grand total: 169 parts.
And three 100ml cans of Tamiya TS14 gloss black paint.
Almost forgot to mention: ofcourse there is a little coffin inside the hearse... 

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The 1925 Model TT Hearse
 
 
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The 1925 Model TT Hearse
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The 1925 Model TT Hearse
 
 
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The 1925 Model TT Hearse
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The 1925 Model TT Hearse
 
 
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The 1925 Model TT Hearse
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The 1925 Model TT Hearse
 
 
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The 1925 Model TT Hearse
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The 1925 Model TT Hearse
 
 
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The 1925 Model TT Hearse
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The 1925 Model TT Hearse
 
 
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The 1925 Model TT Hearse
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 The 1919 Ford Model T Furniture Van

As I'm living in the Netherlands I was looking for a special Dutch Ford Model T for my 1/25 scale Ford Model T collection and found a nice example in a book about the history of my town, a 1919 Ford Model TT with a special bodywork made by Mr. Pluim, a well known local carpenter. The car was used by a furniture shop ('Meubileering Zandbergen' = 'Furniture Zandbergen').
The original picture was very small so I tried to figure out how I could get a better picture. I was surprised when one of my older friends told me that the one of the owners of the shop, Mr. Jaap Zandbergen, was still alive. I found his phone number and asked him about some details. Surprisingly enough he told me that he still had the original picture, it was actually a kind of postcard, and asked me if I would be interested to have the picture on loan for a few days. Well, of course I was. So I asked him if I could pick it up. I figured
that on his age, he is probably 91 years old, he wouldn't jump in his car to bring me the picture. But Mr. Zandbergen declined that offer, asked me were I lived and, as if it was the most normal thing to do for a man of his age, said that he would ump on his bike and bring me the picture Hang on, what did he say, his bike??
Well, one hour later the doorbell rang and yes, old Mr. Zandbergen had arrived on his bike. Talking about old fashioned service! A bit scary though considering his age...
Ofcourse I was pleased with the original picture, but it was not in a very good condition. Not really bad, but with hundreds of small scratches, white spots, black spots and so on. So I decided to restore the picture to get a good and clear picture for my model. You can see the result below, the b/w picture. Of course I made a super glossy print on A4 format of the restored picture for
Mr. Zandbergen and needless to say that he was very, very
pleased with the result.

BTW, Mr. Zandbergen told me that the car was used in the 
weekends for family business and for that purpose two wooden benches could be installed in the rear section. How about that, in 1919 we already had a MPV in our town! What's new... 

I started with the main body construction but it's not an easy job,
re-building a car from just one picture. The chassis is a stock AMT '23 Delivery Van chassis which was lengthened to get the right lenght for a Model T Truck . The bodywork is made from 1mm and 0.5mm plastic. The inside of the cargo section is made from wood.
The cargo reck on the roof was the most difficult thing. 
A total of 26 red copper and brass parts had to be soldered together. I really don't like jobs like that, but it's one of those things you just have do to.
 

The straight parts were not too difficult, but I had a lot of problems to get the curved parts right. 
I managed to get all the doors working and also managed to get real sliding windows on the right and left side of the drivers cabin. And the little window on the separation wall behind the driver is also functional. It can slide too. Neat details, but it does take a lot of manufacturing time.
The amount of parts I used for this part of the car, the main section, isstaggering.
I used:
- 295 wood parts
- 12 clear plastic parts 
- 186 white plastic parts
- 29 copper/brass parts
When I include the parts for the chassis and engine (31), this little 1/25
kit has 553 parts. Phew....

Total building time was almost five months, including the small corrections
I made after I finished the model. Small things, but I had to get
everything perfect. It's a unique model as the original was only build
once, here in my town in the Netherlands.
For the pictures I added some nice 1/25 scale doll house furniture.

 
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 The 1919 Ford Model T Furniture Van
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 The 1919 Ford Model T Furniture Van under construction
 
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 The 1919 Ford Model T Furniture Van under construction
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 The 1919 Ford Model T Furniture Van under construction
 
 
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 The 1919 Ford Model T Furniture Van under construction
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 The 1919 Ford Model T Furniture Van under construction
 
 
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 The 1919 Ford Model T Furniture Van under construction
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 The 1919 Ford Model T Furniture Van under construction
 
 
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 The 1919 Ford Model T Furniture Van
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 The 1919 Ford Model T Furniture Van
 
 
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 The 1919 Ford Model T Furniture Van
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 The 1919 Ford Model T Furniture Van
 
 
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 The 1919 Ford Model T Furniture Van


1920 Ford Model T Railcar

It all started when someone posted the B/W picture of a Model T Railcar on the Hobby Heaven message board
and of course I couldn't resist ;-) 
Well, here it is: the 1920 Ford Model T Railcar. 
I used the standard chassis and radiator from an AMT 1925 Roadster kit and the spare engine hood from a '23 Delivery. For the body I used the front door and window section from the roadster body. 
For the rear part of the body I used another spare roadster body and added a section in the middle with 1mm plastic. The roadster doors on the rear section didn't have the correct shape so I removed the outlines and made new outlines with the correct shape. 
The front window frame was scrap made. 
The wheels are from a 1923 Budweiser kit and after tinkering around with them for some time I got it finally right. I removed all the spokes, added the wheel tread and flange, a solid centre and glued the centre parts of the old wheel back in place. The tread was covered with BMF.
The top was a difficult part. I had spare tops from the 1927 T Touring, but these were too short and the shape was all wrong. I constructed the new top by cutting both touring tops in half, slightly more than that to get the right length, and managed to get the shape right with some plastic putty. And of course I added all the other little pieces, mostly scrap made. 
The whole car was painted flat black and received a nice coat of railway dust. 
The two electric lamps (I guess they are lamps...) on the left and right below the windshield are still missing. I couldn't get the right size of lamps, but found a nice pair a week ago. I should have waited with the pictures until the car was ready, but I finished the diorama yesterday and I was rather anxious to see how the pictures would look with the railcar. Picture update follows...
 

1920 Ford Model T Railcar

 
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 1920 Ford Model T Railcar
 1920 Ford Model T Railcar
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1920 Ford Model T Railcar
1920 Ford Model T Railcar



 
 
 

1923 Ford Model T Tractor

As there are no 1/25 scale model kits from old Ford tractors, I decided to design and make my own Ford Model T tractor. I started with a standard chassis from an AMT kit which was shortened at the rear. Engine is stock T with an extra transmission and larger differential from another kit. 
The front wheels are from a AMT í23 Delivery Van kit. I added a rim in the middle of the front wheels as often seen on these vintage tractor wheels. The rear wheels are G scale luggage car wheels. I added a 7mm wide 0.5mm thin strip on the wheels and made the ribs of the wheels from Evergreen 2mm L-shaped profile. To add some realism I Ďboltedí the ribs with Grandt Line #99 bolts.
The driverís seat was made from a disposable plastic coffee spoon. Steering wheel is from my spare parts box. The gas tank was scrap made from plastic and put on top of the engine, a 'design feature' other tractors had too in those days. The tool box was scrap made from L-shaped plastic profile and thin strips of wood. The gear shift lever is a simple pin with a small bead as knob.
And the whiskey jug in the toolbox is from the AMT/Ertl Beverly Hillbillies Buick kit.
Thanks, Granny!
I have to add some weathering to the wheels as they look a bit too clean at the moment.


 
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 1923 Ford Model T Tractor
 1923 Ford Model T Tractor
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 1923 Ford Model T Tractor
 1923 Ford Model T Tractor
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1923 Ford Model T Tractor
 
And here are some pictures I made after I applied some 
weathering to the model. Not too much, just enough 
to make it look like it was used:
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1923 Ford Model T Tractor
1923 Ford Model T Tractor
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1923 Ford Model T Tractor
1923 Ford Model T Tractor

 
1927 Ford Model T Roadster
This car started as a resin model from Hendrix Mfg. Co. The fenders of that kit are customized and as a strictly stock builder I decided to use a 1927 Model T Touring fender assembly from the AMT Model T Touring kit #6582. 
This kit was also used as the donor kit for the wheels, tires, chassis and other parts. The rear fenders were cut off and replaced by the rear resin fenders from the Hendrix kit. The interior parts and front seat are again from the Touring.
The body was a bit too low for a correct fit to the stock AMT assembly, so I had to raise it by adding about 1.5 mm to the underside.
The wire wheels were a bit modified. I didn't like the thick spokes, so I decided to trim them and removed as much material as possible. It does look very nice, the spokes are less than 1mm thick now, but the wheels are now very fragile due to the lack of material. In the picture you can see the difference between the modified (upper part) and unmodified (lower part) spokes.
The windscreen from the AMT kit was a little bit too wide for the roadster body, so I removed a small section in the middle. The folded hood is from a í25 AMT kit. It was also a bit too wide and about 2mm were removed in the middle. The body and wheels were painted in Tamiya bright red. 

 
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 1927 Ford Model T Roadster
 1927 Ford Model T Roadster
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           Before                                 After  
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1927 Ford Model T Roadster
1927 Ford Model T Roadster

 
 
1926 Ford Model T Tudor
This time a 1926 Ford Model T Tudor Sedan, converted to stock using a Revell 1926 Model T Sedan Delivery and an AMT 1927 Model T Touring. Some time ago I 'un-customized' the Revell 1926 Ford T Sedan Delivery. And a member of the Model T Club of America suggested using the Sedan Delivery as base for the 1926 Tudor.
I had a kit from the 1927 Touring, so I decided to use that kit for the chassis, engine, engine hood and fender assembly.
The body of the Revell was lowered so I added a 1.5mm strip to the underside to bring it back to normal height. The rear of the body had wheel arches to fit the custom tires and were filled with plastic. Basically the same work what I had done before on the Sedan Delivery. I had to use the custom dashboard because of the width and shape, but removed all the gauges and other stuff. They were replaced with the original gauges of the stock version. These were cut out of a stock dashboard and thinned by filing that much from the back until they were thin enough. And in the process I thinned the skin of my fingers too...
I also added the support for the steering wheel underneath the dashboard.
After that I had to find out how to deal with the inside of the body. Obviously I couldn't use the custom panel work, but I would like to have some kind of original panel work. First I tried to make some of 1mm styrene, but that was too thick for the curved ends at the rear. The 0.5mm was much better, so that problem was solved. But after cutting out the windows... well, I had to be very careful handling the pieces as there was not much material left at the top of the panels as you can see. Next problem was the front window. I couldn't use the nice custom window (with two wipers instead of one), so I had to figure out a way to get a new frame. After tinkering around with some styrene I made the front part of the windshield from 0.25mm styrene and the rear part from 0.5mm styrene so I could 'sandwich' the clear window between them. Again, after the frame was cut I had to be extremely careful handling the 0.25mm thick (thin...) frame. Oh well, it turned out nice. I glued in place, but I left it a little bit ajar. Yeah I know, showing off...
The rear bench is from the '27 Touring kit and the front seats are from an early A Ford Woodie.
After I found a good, large picture of the spare wheel I could finally figure out how it was mounted on the chassis and build it from scrap.
The last thing I added was a rear view mirror, mounted on the top hinge of the drivers door with help of a tiny strip of red copper (about 4mm long and 1mm wide... boy, I lost that thing about three times... lol) and the shortened rear view mirror of the Revell kit. The last thing I changed were the front and rear bumper mounting brackets. They were a bit too long, so shortened them by about 2mm.

All in all a lot of work, but I think the result looks pretty stock now. 

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Restoring a resin 1926 Ford Model T Coupe.
Anthony has spent over five months restoring a resin model of a 1926 Ford Model T Coupe. It took that long to get every detail right, but now the master for the model is ready. Only thing left for me is to fine someone who can cast this little gem in resin (resin is a natural or synthetic compound which begins in a highly viscous state and hardens with treatment and often used by model builders to make 
small runs of a master).
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I bought this resin model a long time ago. I've never seen it on the
eBay auction site again, so I presume the person who made this
went out of resin business. It was not a very good cast, but with 
some TLC it still could make a nice model of the rare Coupe
(read: how to make a silk purse from a pig's ear...):
A small strip of Evergreen was used to get the correct height:
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The rear fenders from the '27 Touring were used and modified:
 
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The trunk lines were re-scribed at the correct place and 
about 100 little holes were filled:
I finally found some large pictures on the internet of a '26 Coupe and made a lot of corrections. The window frames in the doors were not correct and the distance between the top of the window frames and the roof was wrong. So to get everything right I decided to cut of the old roof, checked and corrected everything and made a new roof. 
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The firewall got some attention. I added a few details and it looks
pretty original now. I discovered that the sunvisor of a
'29 Ford Pickup was almost perfect and with some modifications
it's now a '26 Model T sunvisor.
The complete car, now finished as it should be:
The roof, windshield frame and sunvisor are still seperate parts:
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The fender assembly also received some details. Maybe they
look a bit large, but I figured that in the process of sanding a
resin body these easily could be lost completely so I decided
that a slightly larger size would be more sensible:
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And now I have to find someone who can cast this little gem in resin....

In October 2010 I finished the 1926 Ford Model T 'Doctors' Coupe for which I made the master and Jimmy Flintstone 
did the casting. 
The project started with a not very well made casting which I bought several years ago. You can see that body on the first picture.
A lot of work and weeks later I finally got a correct Coupe body and fender assembly. That's the second picture. 
After I posted some pictures from the body/fender parts on teh Spotloght Hobbies Message Board the general comment was: 'You have to cast that thing!'.
Which was not a bad idea :-)
I contacted Jimmy Flintstone, a professional caster, and he was willing to have a go at it. And the result of his work was very good, see picture three.
Right, now that I had a couple of resin kits of the '26 T Coupe it was time to build one.
And to find out if I made any big (master) boo-boo's...
Well, surprisingly enough it all went together rather smooth.
The floor section was easy and for the interior parts I made some panels from 010" styrene. On the back of the panels I glued another piece of  010" styrene with a slighlty bigger window frame. That enabled me to slide the windows, made from 010" clear styrene, in place by just sliding them in that slot. You can see that on picture seven.
Ofcourse that neat little trick only works with straight windows.
To be sure that the body would fit on the right place on the fender assembly, I mounted two 1 mm brass pins in the body. Two 1mm holes in the fender assembly would secure the body in the correct place.
I added as much details as I could to the interior. And I remembered just in time to take some pictures of it, before I glued the roof in place ;-)
On the last five pictures you can see the finished car.
And to answer the question: Did I discover any big mistakes?
No, no big mistakes.
Just a few things that needed attention in case I ever should make another master.
For example, making all parts fit is nice, but a too correct fit means that there's not enough room for the parts to get together after the paint job. Next time, I'll leave a bit more space between the parts.
And allthough I was afraid that some details wouldn't 'survive' the casting process, everything turned out very nice.
Maybe I'll have a go at another T..... 

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1924 Ford Model T Forest Fire Department
I finally had time in November 2008 to start a new Model T project! Brian Austin posted this picture on the Spotlight Hobbies Message Board (http://wwwboard.spotlighthobbies.com) some time ago:
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Well, I couldnít resist (as usual...) and started in November 2008 
with one of the most difficult parts: the pump assembly at the front. Almost all parts were scratch built except two brass and one
aluminium part and the red valve handle at the top, I Ďstoleí that
from an old Italeri Fire Jeep kit...
For the rest of the car I used only the spare Model T parts I 
had laying around in my parts stash. 'No complete model kits were harmed or used in the process of making this car' ;-)
The rear view; I added a small water tank and some
bigger rear tires and wheels:
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Top rear view:
The pump is a bit bigger than on Brian's original picture, but itís
fine with me. It's almost ready, just a few more things to add and
I have to figure out how the whole unit was mounted on the car:
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I had plans to add some more (heavier) things to the Ford, but I remembered in time what my fellow model builder Art Anderson said about the underpowered T engine, so the only things Iím going add are 
a couple of water hoses, a spare tire on the drivers side and some
small things. I have two engine hoods for the car, a closed one and an opened one as seen on the original picture. I had to remove about a 
ton of plastic of the original hood to get the thickness right, but I got 
the job done. And itís really, really thin now. And looking just right.
And after a few coatings with a fire red color and with a few
more goodies added, you'll get an idea of the final shape.
I used all kind of parts for the kit. For example, the brass hand
railing you see on the tank was made from 0.5mm brass wire and 
small stanchions they use on model ships.
And the nice brass ends on the firehoses are actually 
portholes they use on small scale... yep, model ships.
I had to ask a co-worker at the office, who has a lathe, to make the firehose nozzles. It did take some time, but early
March 2009 I finally got them and I could finish the model.
The text and logo in gold on the car were made with the DecalPRO system. It does take a little time to get used to,
it's not your average decal system, but the results are very good (if interested, see the website: http://www.pulsarprofx.com/decalpro/)
I added some wiring to the engine, made the lid of the tank functional, added a brass bell at the driver's side (just in case) and a spare wheel. I used a spare roadster body (from a 'glue bomb' kit) to get the extra door I needed to create the open door on the passenger side. The fire hoses are from my local Saab car dealer. It's just black electric wire from which I removed the copper centre wires. Simple, but it looks very good. 
This kit has a lot of added parts. To get an idea: the spare wheel assembly only was made from 31 seperate parts. The pump assembly at the front took a staggering 101 seperate parts because of all the little bolts and nuts I had to add for a realistic look

And here is the result:

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I just finished the 1924 Ford Model T Speedster with the Mercury Body from Aardvark models.
No problems building the kit, but I changed a few things and added a lot of details. This is my first Model T with a working steering system. It took me two weeks to figure out a system that looked and realistic and worked well.

Here's the whole story:

First I added some details to the ragtop. The resin top from the kit had rudimentary resin mounting pins, but I decided to make proper mountings. I glued a 0.5mm brass rod inside the top and left about 6mm to each side as small mounting pin. 
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First I added some details to the ragtop. The resin top from the kit had rudimentary resin mounting pins, but I decided to make proper mountings. I glued a 0.5mm brass rod inside the top and left about 6mm to each side as small mounting pin.  And I made a pair of 3mm x 3mm brackets for the side of the body from brass parts. Here you can see one for test fitting 
While I was busy building and painting the parts, I suddenly thought that this would be a great model to try to get steerable wheels on. I had some ideas, but none of them looked very realistic. And if possible
the wheels should roll too.
After two weeks I finally had the solution

 
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First of all, the front axle had to be modified.
Here is a picture of the axle before the modification
And after the modification was made.
And here are all the parts of the steering assembly. 

The completed steering arm. The thin litlle round plates you see will be attached to the wheels, they are not glued to anything else thus leaving the wheel free to revolve. 
They are hold in place by a small pin in the middle. 
The hole in the wheel (for the fixed steel axle) was widened to provide room for the head of the pin. 

This picture shows all the parts for the steering assembly put together.
Remember, all this is 1/25 scale!

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And this is how it looks on the car.

As it is a full fendered speedster, I decided to leave all other parts as they were. Just as if someone had simply swapped the factory body with the Mercury body.

A gas cap (with the red M for Mercury) was made from scrap. The windshield got a few wind deflectors, leftovers from another T and resized to get the correct height. The radiator was a bit reshaped. I
rounded of the sharp edges at the top and added a small decal with the Mercury emblem. The little door and trunk lid received handles and the dashboard also received the necessary details.

And here are the pictures of the completed car.

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1925 Ford Model T Hotel Taxi
This is the 1925 Ford Model T Hotel Taxi. or my version of the famous Monogram Tijuana Taxi!
I was in the middle of my í34 Ford project and had finished seven í34 Fordís with another seven to go. And I was looking for a kind of in between model to do. 
When I noticed that Monogram had reissued the famous Tijuana Taxi I immediately knew what to do!
On the first two pictures you can see how the original kit was supposed to look.
I bought the Tijuana kit and started work on it. The chassis, wheels and tires, engine came from the spare parts box. No problem, lotís of T stuff there.
First thing I had to do was to narrow the rear of the body so it would fit to a í25 Ford fender assembly. And ofcourse I had to add the correct piece of bodywork including firewall at the front.
After that I made the divider with a window which separates the driver from the rear passenger compartment.
On the pictures you can see the progress and the changes I made to the original bodywork.
For the outside of the taxi I used as many parts of the original Tijuana taxi as possible. I did add a small chest on the right running board. Just because it looked nice. 
And after a paint job in black and maroon, hereís the finished Model T Hotel Taxi.

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Anthony has started a new series of Model A Ford models and along with
these he made a new background whch took over 300 parts to compete.
Again you can click on these images for a larger view in a new window.

 
1929 Ford Model A Woodie
1929 Ford Model A Woodie
1929 Ford Model A Woodie
1929 Ford Model A Woodie

 
 
To View the rest of Anthony's Model A Ford Models Click on the image
To view and compare these model to the real cars click on the images above

 
Anthony's Favorite Model and Car Sites

 

Model T Ford Club of America

1938 Ford Pickup Truck Project Site
Scale Wagon Aficionad
Super Cars Net
The Ultimatecarpage
Model T Ford Club International
Lars-Goran Lindgren Model Car Kits

 
Links to Old Car and Truck Pictures Web Sites

 
John's Old Car and Truck Pictures
Where we live and what we do
Plastic Kits - Plastic Model Kits UK - Plastic Aircraft Model, Plastic Vehicle Model, Plastic Model Ships
UK based Just Kits & Models 
Aircraft, ship, boats and road vechicle
A Picture Tour of the Car of American Motors
The Cars of American Motors
A Picture tour of the Nash
The Nash
A Picture tour of the Hudson
The Hudson
The Hudson and Terraplane from Australia
The Hudson, Essex, and Terraplanes
that were found in Australia
The 1952 cars of The World
The Netherlands and most of Europe has a large following of North American Cars
The Old Cars of the Netherlands
A Picture tour of the Packard
The Packard
Once you saw one you would never forget it. The Studebaker
The Studebaker
Those Old Classic Convertibles
Cadillac, Duesenberg, Cords and many more
A Picture tour of the Jeep from 1940 to the present
The Jeep from 1940 to the present
A Picture tour of the Kaiser and Henry J
The Kaiser and the Frazer
Eric Gordon's Kaiser Rebuild
There are many pictures showing 
the details of this Rebuild
All you Kaiser lovers would like to have one of these. Watch it being made.
Eric Gordon's 1954 Kaiser 
Convertible Convertion
Eric Gordon's First Kaiser
A 1951 Deluxe which comes to a startling end
A Picture tour of the Volkswagen This site has some very old VW pictures
The Volkswagen from 1932 to the end of the Beetle
Pickup Trucks from 1940 to 1969 this a few before and after and after
Those wonderful Pickup Trucks
A Picture tour of the Crosley
That Cute Little Crosley
A Picture Tour of the
The Henry J
A Picture Review of the Chevrolet
from 1916 tto 1970
The Pontiac
The Corvair 1960 to 1969
The Chevrolet Corvette
From 1963 to 1970
The Ford Motor Company from 1908 to 1969
The Ford Mustang
Click here to View the Jeeps of World War II
WW II Jeeps
The Chrysler Airflow
v
The Amphicar
View some of John Evan's  Artwork
View some of John' Evan's Artwork 
This site has quite a collections of
John's artwork.
View these old cars as you haven't before.
Yes you can get a Jeep stuck, Really stuck if you just half try.
How to Get a Jeep Really Stuck
E Mail link
johnmacdoanld@summerville-novascotia.com

 
 
 


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